forgo


forgo
forgo, forbear, abnegate, eschew, sacrifice are comparable when they denote to deny oneself something for the sake of an end.
One forgoes for the sake of policy, expediency, or the welfare of others something already enjoyed or indulged in, or within reach
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he agreed . . . to forgo all remuneration until his apprenticeship was completed— Brooks

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Often the word implies surrender or abandonment
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in electing this peculiar freedom of its own, vers lib re . . . has forgone the great harmonic, orchestral effects of the older verse— Lowes

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One forbears, through motives of prudence, kindness, or charity, doing or saying something one wishes or is tempted to do or say. Forbear usually implies self-restraint
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although ... I do not get much help from general propositions in a case of this sort, I cannot forbear quoting what seems to me applicable here— Justice Holmes

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One abnegates what is intrin-sically good but not consistent with one's aims, principles, or limitations
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to treat English poetry as though it had died with Tennyson ... is to abnegate high hope for the sake of a barren convenience— Quiller-Couch

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Often abnegate implies renunciation or self-effacement, but this distinction is not as commonly maintained in the verb as in the derivative noun abnegation
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communities dedi-cated to the living of a humble and self-abnegating life— Mumford

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One eschews (see also ESCAPE 2) something tempting, sometimes on moral or aesthetic grounds but more often because abstention or self-restraint is necessary for the achievement of a more significant desire or end
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to work within these strict limits, eschewing all the helps to illusion that modeling and shadow give, was doubtless an exercise of incomparable service to the artist— Binyon

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some of the millionaires eschewed palatial magnificence— F. L. Allen

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One sacrifices something highly desirable or in itself of great value for the sake of a person, ideal, or end dearer to one than the thing or person involved; the term typically connotes renunciation and self-denial and a religious or ethical motive comparable to that of self-immolation
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sacrificed a college education for the sake of supporting his mother

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sacrificed his life in defense of his country

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I do not mean that the well-to-do should . . . forgo educational opportunities which ... are not open to all. To do that would be to sacrifice civilization to justice— Russell

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sacrificed their fortune in the world for theology's sake -H. O. Taylor

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Analogous words: waive, Relinquish, surrender, abandon: renounce, resign, *abdicate

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Forgó — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Léda Forgó (* 1973), deutsch ungarische Schriftstellerin Nikolaus Forgó (* 1968), deutscher Hochschullehrer Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demselb …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Forgo — For*go , v. t. [imp. {Forwent}; p. p. {Forgone}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Forgoing}.] [OE. forgan, forgon, forgoon, AS. forg[=a]n, prop., to go past, hence, to abstain from; pref. for + g[=a]n to go; akin to G. vergehen to pass away, to transgress. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • forgo — forgo, forego Both words are pronounced with the stress on the second syllable. Forgo means ‘to go without, abstain from’; forego means ‘to go before, precede’ and occurs principally in the forms foregoing and foregone (see the separate entries… …   Modern English usage

  • forgo — I verb abandon, abjure, abnegate, abstain from, avoid, bypass, cast aside, cast off, cease, decline, desist from, dimittere, discard, discontinue, dismiss, dispense with, dispose of, do without, eliminate, eschew, forbear, forsake, forswear, give …   Law dictionary

  • forgo — (v.) to relinquish, O.E. forgan go away, pass over, leave undone, from FOR (Cf. for ) away + gan go (see GO (Cf. go)). Related: Forgoing; forgone …   Etymology dictionary

  • forgo — [v] give up, do without abandon, abdicate, abjure, abstain, cede, desist, eschew, forbear, forsake, give in, go on the wagon*, leave alone, leave out, pack in*, pass, pass on, pass up, quit, refrain, relinquish, renounce, resign, resist,… …   New thesaurus

  • forgo — (also forego) ► VERB (forgoes; past forwent; past part. forgone) ▪ go without (something desirable). ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • forgo — [fôr gō′] vt. forwent, forgone, forgoing [ME forgon < OE forgan: see FOR & GO2] 1. Obs. a) to go past b) to overlook; neglect 2 …   English World dictionary

  • forgo — (also forego) verb ADVERB ▪ willingly ▪ She would willingly forgo her presents if only her warring parents would declare a truce. VERB + FORGO ▪ have to ▪ Time to prepare was a luxury he would hav …   Collocations dictionary

  • forgo — UK [fɔː(r)ˈɡəʊ] / US [fɔrˈɡoʊ] verb [transitive] Word forms forgo : present tense I/you/we/they forgo he/she/it forgoes present participle forgoing past tense forwent UK [fɔː(r)ˈwent] / US [fɔrˈwent] past participle forgone UK [fɔː(r)ˈɡɒn] / US… …   English dictionary


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